Learn about your septic system

Level 1 1.png
Beginner 2.png
Beginner 1.png
Beginner 3.png
Beginner 4.png
Level 2.png
Intermediate 1.png
Intermediate 2.png
Intermediate 3.png
Intermediate 4.png

Other Helpful Articles

Routine Maintenance


As much as we would all love to bury our septic systems and never think of them again, routine maintenance can be crucial to the system's function, not to mention the protection of the environment from harmful wastewater as well as keeping your wallet happy. Just like any other system in your home (i.e. air filters, water heaters, etc.) your septic system needs regular attention. This article aims to educate you on the components that need regular maintenance and why.

First, it is helpful to know the basics of how a septic system works. If you are unsure, please check out our article about it by clicking here.

Second, the type of septic system you have makes a large difference in the amount and frequency requirements of routine maintenance. We will cover the basic types of septic systems and required maintenance here.


Gravity Systems:

A "Gravity" Septic System is exactly what it sounds like. The only thing involved in moving the water through the pipes is the force of gravity. These are the most simple systems and were very common until only recent history. This type of system also requires the least amount of routine maintenance which is the biggest perk of owning a system like this. For more details on the pros and cons of these systems visit our article on "Modern Treatment Technology", this post will focus on the components that need to be checked up on periodically.

1. Outlet Tee or Baffle - Check Yearly

This is the most crucial component to a gravity system. It keeps organic matter that floats at the top of the septic tank from going into the Soil Treatment Area (STA or leach field). Even just a few weeks with a damaged or broken Outlet Tee can cause an STA to fail. If you have a concrete tank there may be what is called a Baffle, which is simply a concrete wall that protects the outlet pipe from the organic matter. The danger with a concrete baffle is that the concrete can corrode over time leaving your leach field vulnerable. Simply check once a year that your Outlet Tee or Baffle is not letting surface water in from the top of your tank.










2. Effluent Filter - Clean Yearly

Some gravity septic systems use a filter placed in the outlet tee that protects your STA from "effluent" or tiny particles suspended in the septic tank. These filters work extremely well in protecting your STA but they can plug if neglected for too long. When they become plugged, the water will find the path of least resistance which in most cases would be into your basement! If you have an effluent filter, get it cleaned at least every 12 months.
















3. Get it Pumped - Every 2-4 years (depending on use)

Every septic system needs to be pumped periodically. That is because STAs are only designed to treat water and the small organic matter suspended in it. Septic tanks actually act as a holding tank for large solids, which means they will eventually fill the tank and cause issues if not removed. For homes with large families we recommend pumping every 2 -3 years, while smaller homes can wait up to 4 years to be pumped.










Pressure Dosed Systems:

Pressure dosed systems require more maintenance than traditional systems. This is because there are simply more components that can fail. However, these systems are far superior for wastewater treatment. Again, for more information check out our post on "Modern Treatment Technology". Here is list of the components that should be maintained:


1. Outlet Tee or Baffle

This is the most crucial component to a gravity system. It keeps organic matter that floats at the top of the septic tank from going into the STA. Even just a few weeks with a damaged or broken Outlet Tee can cause a Soil Treatment Area to fail. If you have a concrete tank there may be what is called a Baffle, which is simply a concrete wall that protects the outlet pipe from the organic matter. The danger with a concrete baffle is that the concrete can corrode over time leaving your STA vulnerable. Simply check once a year that your Outlet Tee or Baffle is not letting surface water in from the top of your tank.


2. Effluent Filter

Some septic systems use a filter